People

Amy Van Cise

Amy Van Cise

Amy is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She studies short- and long-term changes in cetacean population structure, and how those changes relate to the effect of climate change on oceanography and ecosystem dynamics. As an interdisciplinary student with the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Amy is studying the integration of local environmental knowledge into research, management and policy decisions regarding marine resources.


Chris Neighbors

Chris Neighbors

Chris is a master's student in the Marine Biodiversity and Conservation program at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Previously, he spent ten years working in film and television with a speciality in new media. Chris aspires to communicate to broad audiences and enact public awareness on climate issues. His key interests are coral reef biodiversity and indigenous community conservation movements.


Nick Obradovich

Nick Obradovich

Nick is a PhD student in the Political Science Department at the University of California at San Diego and a fellow at the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research centers on understanding the potential impacts that climate change may have on democracy in developing countries. He is also engaged in work seeking to estimate the effect of unusual weather on Americans' political attitudes about climate change. Due to his work on the politics of climate change, Nick is acutely aware of the need for improved communication of cutting edge climate science to the world's policymakers. Nick's website can be viewed here.


Lauren Linsmayer

Lauren Linsmayer

Lauren Linsmayer is a PhD student in Marine Biology at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She is currently researching the physiological mechanisms underlying corals' response to to ocean acidification. She is using techniques from transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics to understand the multiple levels of coordinated response to changes in their environmental pH from the anthropogenic acidification of the oceans. Understanding these basic mechanisms will help scientists develop models for how corals will respond to future changes in pH. This information can be combined with other response variables, such as temperature and pollution, to forecast the future status of reefs. Lauren is using her NSF IGERT Fellowship to learn how best to communicate her research findings to policymakers in order to increase its impact on coral reef conservation.


Natalya Gallo

Natalya Gallo

Natalya is a PhD student in the Biological Oceanography department at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and is a fellow of the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation. She is interested in how low oxygen, low pH conditions in eastern boundary current regions with oxygen minimum zones influence the structure and function of demersal fish communities along continental margins and how climate change-driven ocean deoxygenation will impact food webs and our fisheries. Support through the NSF IGERT program for Global Change, Marine Ecosystems, and Society, has allowed her to explore international attitudes towards climate change mitigation and the role of science and scientists in informing policy. She is a proud co-founder of Ocean Scientists for Informed Policy and has attended UNFCCC COP19 in Warsaw, Poland and COP20 in Lima, Peru. 


Kathryn Furby

Kate Furby

Kate is a Marine Biology PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. As a coral reef ecologist, she studies the impacts of climate change on coral recovery mechanisms on a population and community level. She has a passion for science communication and is working to find new interfaces for sharing student research with the public. Kate's website can be viewed here. You can follow her @seakaterun on Twitter.


Sierra Joy Stevens-McGeever

Sierra Joy Stevens-McGeever

Sierra is a graduate student in marine biology at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. Sierra’s graduate research focused on movement patterns of Nassau Grouper, an important predator on Caribbean coral reefs that is now endangered due to overfishing. She completed an internship focused on science policy at the San Francisco Bay Joint Venture, which was funded by a grant from the Edna Bailey Sussman Foundation. She teaches for UC Extension and writes for Explorations Now, Scripps’ monthly magazine. After graduation Sierra will pursue a career in scientific travel writing. This type of writing capitalizes on people’s inherent interest in the natural world and educates the reader by bringing them along on research expeditions. Sierra will write first hand accounts from the field, filled with colorful descriptions of the travel and educational pieces on the methods, context and results of the research. Sierra hopes to bridge the gap between cutting edge science and the public’s understanding of our natural world. Sierra’s website can be viewed here. You can follow her on Instagram at SierraJoysPhotos


Yassir Eddebbar

Yassir is a PhD Student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He uses measurements of atmospheric gases such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, noble gases and their isotopes to understand ocean-atmosphere interactions and their mechanisms, such as changes in the global oceans' heat content, ocean circulation, and carbon sinks efficiency. Through his NSF Interdisciplinary Graduate Education and Research Training fellowship, Yassir hopes to communicate and explore the implications of his research by engaging policymakers and the general public on the important role of the world's oceans in global climate change.


Noah Ben-Aderet

Noah Ben-Aderet

I’m a 5th year doctoral candidate at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a co-director of the Small-scale and Artisanal Fisheries Research Network (SAFRN). I currently study California populations of yellowtail (Seriola lalandi): characterizing the fishery which targets them, tracking their inshore and offshore seasonal movements and quantifying their offshore spawning habitat; these are all affected by both changing climate and human exploitation of the marine environment. Prior to attending Scripps, I completed an M.Sc. at Bar-Ilan University and the Inter-University Institute for Marine Science in Eilat, Israel, studying the effects of ocean acidification on reef-building corals. Attending the COP is an invaluable opportunity to take part in, and further understand how international policy is made and global issues are addressed. As a scientist concerned about global marine health, exposure to international policy-making is crucial to helping me understand these critical environmental issues.

Contact Information

Ocean Scientists for Informed Policy
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92083-0202